Be prepared when walking alone Saint John NB

Today's young women have been conditioned to be alert and attentive when walking through dark areas, particularly on university campuses that can oft ...

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Be prepared when walking alone

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Photo courtesy of metrocreativegraphics.com

(NC)-Today's young women have been conditioned to be alert and attentive when walking through dark areas, particularly on university campuses that can often be poorly lit.

Women tend to be leery of walking alone at night and often bring with them a cell phone to have handy in the event of an emergency. Yet, a sense of fear is still prevalent among females on today's university campuses. In fact, a recent Energizer study showed 65 per cent of women polled said they feel fear or unsafe while walking alone at night.

While today the cell phone is a standard commodity in most women's purses, there are a number of other compact, protective devices women can carry with them for peace of mind.

Samantha Wilson, president of Kidproof Canada and a former police officer, says the simplest of tools can be used to scare off potential offenders or provide basic security when walking late at night.

"Many women often forget the value of carrying small, convenient objects, such as a whistle, penlight, flashlight or panic alarm," said Wilson. "While nothing is foolproof, having just one of these devices can help in the event you feel threatened."

According to the Energizer study, only a small percentage of women carry protective devices, a statistic Wilson sees as disheartening. Wilson stresses the importance of carrying these compact items, and offers the following suggestions for those who choose to use them:

• Know your tool: Practice turning panic alarms and penlights on and off so you're ready to go when you need it.

• Keep it close: Store compact devices in external purse pockets or easily accessible jacket pockets where they can be pulled out within seconds.

• Power up: Test the batteries regularly and keep a spare in a safe place so you're never left stranded.

• Share the wealth: Bring an extra device to lend to a friend in need, particularly when having to split up part way through a commute.

More information about protection devices and portable lighting is available online at www.energizer.ca.

Credit: www.newscanada.com