Communication in relationships Charlottetown PE

If you, or your partner, is having intimacy issues, it may be something that can negatively affect the future of your relationship. It is important that you and your partner communicate honestly and openly.

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Communication in relationships

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(NC)-Psychotherapist, relationship and sex therapist Rebecca Rosenblat says that communication on all levels is important in making a relationship work. This is especially true for intimacy. While communication is very important, it can be very hard to initiate, especially when the topic is sensitive.

A recent survey of 1,735 Canadians conducted by Leger Marketing and sponsored by Eli Lilly Canada Inc. found the difference between what people think they would do if they had an issue that was negatively impacting their sexual relationship is really quite different from what people actually do.

The research showed that nearly eight-in-ten people believe that sexual intimacy is an important part of their lives. When asked who they would speak to first to discuss problems in the bedroom such as erectile dysfunction (ED), 54 per cent said it would be their partner. Among those who had actually suffered from ED, only 43 percent spoke to their partner first when they realized there was a problem - 27 per cent said they spoke to no one.

Respondents also differed significantly when it came to who they thought they would be comfortable speaking with about a sexual intimacy issue. For those respondents who had not experienced ED, almost nine out of ten (89 per cent) believed that they would be comfortable talking to their partner about it; however, among those who had experienced it, a surprising 65 per cent said they were comfortable talking to their partner.

"These statistics seem to indicate that couples think they can speak openly with each other but when the situation actually arises there are some barriers to opening the lines of communication," says Rosenblat. "Clearly there is a need to engage in open communication on an ongoing basis and not to wait until you have something serious to talk about."

Conversations about sexuality don't only happen between couples; often times speaking with a physician is an important step towards solving the problem. The survey showed that 85 per cent of those who had not suffered from ED felt that they would speak with their physician if they experienced the problem, while only 35 per cent of those who had experienced ED actually did.

"It is important for couples to realize that if they are experiencing problems, there is help available and they should speak with their physician. The conversation might be hard to start but it is an important one to have as ED might be linked to an existing or underlying medical condition and a physician can provide treatment options that are most appropriate for their lifestyle," continues Rosenblat.

Often when there is a problem in the bedroom, such as ED, it can lead to other problems in a relationship, if it isn't properly discussed, explains Rosenblat. Anger, resentment and frustration can occur when one partner thinks the connection is being lost. By speaking to your partner and speaking with your doctor, these problems can often be corrected before they turn into larger issues.

- News Canada