Fast facts about children and diabetes in Canada Winnipeg MB

• Experts say children born in 2,000 have a one in three chance of developing diabetes. Poor eating habits and lack of physical activity are causing ...

BMO Bank of Montreal
(204) 985-2611
335 Main St
Winnipeg, MB
Type
Branch with ABM

Scotiabank
(204) 985-3660
623 Corydon Avenue At Daly
Winnipeg, MB
 
BMO Bank of Montreal
Osborne Street
Winnipeg, MB
Type
ABM

BMO Bank of Montreal
Marion Street
Winnipeg, MB
Type
ABM

Scotiabank
(204) 985-3011
200 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, MB
 
BMO Bank of Montreal
(204) 985-2480
330 Portage Ave
Winnipeg, MB
Type
Branch with ABM

BMO Bank of Montreal
St Mary Avenue
Winnipeg, MB
Type
ABM

BMO Bank of Montreal
Osborne Street North
Winnipeg, MB
Type
ABM

BMO Bank of Montreal
Osborne Street
Winnipeg, MB
Type
ABM

Scotiabank
(204) 985-3750
235 Marion Street
Winnipeg, MB
 

Fast facts about children and diabetes in Canada

Provided By:

• Experts say children born in 2,000 have a one in three chance of developing diabetes. Poor eating habits and lack of physical activity are causing more kids to be diagnosed with the preventable form of the disease.

• Over two million Canadians have been diagnosed with diabetes, a disease that contributes to approximately 41,500 deaths per year.

• There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 (insulin-dependent), Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) and gestational (affecting pregnant women).

• Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes) is most commonly diagnosed from infancy into the mid 20s, although it can occur at any age. With this type of diabetes, a person's pancreas produces little or no insulin. Although the causes are not entirely known, scientists believe the body's own defense system (the immune system) attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. People with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin several times every day.

• Type 2 diabetes usually develops after age 40, however, more kids are being diagnosed with this often preventable form of diabetes every day. With Type 2, the pancreas still produces insulin, but the body does not produce enough or is not able to use it effectively. Treatment includes diet control, regular physical activity, self-monitoring of blood glucose and, in some cases, oral drugs or insulin.

What can kids and parents do to improve their overall health and reduce their risk factors? Visit Concerned Children's Advertiser's website at www.cca-kids.ca for their "Long Live Kids" public awareness and education program that provides information on how to move more, eat smart and be media wise. You can also visit the Canadian Diabetes Association at www.diabetes.ca.

Credit: www.newscanada.com