Healthy Diets for Pregnancies Charlottetown PE

To maintain a proper gestational diabetes diet, the diet should keep the mother's blood sugar as normal as possible and at the same time, it has to provide all the required nutrition to both the mother and growing fetus. This includes larger amounts of minerals and vitamins which can be taken in the form of more low fat diary products, whole grain cereals and breads, fruits and vegetables. If the doctor in Charlottetown prescribed additional prenatal vitamins, they should be taken in conjunction with the proper gestational diet. These prenatal vitamins can be taken at night before bed or early in the morning so that the iron can be easily absorbed on empty stomach.

Maypoint Plaza
(902) 628-2020
Charlottetown, PE
 
Polyclinic
(902) 629-8856
Charlottetown, PE
 
Men's Health Clinic
(902) 367-8000
20 Water St
Charlottetown, PE
 
Coady Kenneth Dr Phys
(902) 628-6800
30 Av Linden
Charlottetown, PE
 
Queen Elizabeth Hospital
(902) 894-2027
Charlottetown, PE
 
Craswell Jefferey Dr Professional Corporation
(902) 628-6528
220 Water St
Charlottetown, PE
 
Chief Coroner
(902) 628-6220
Charlottetown, PE
 
Clark Don Dr Professional Corporation
(902) 628-1801
215 Av Belvedere
Charlottetown, PE
 
Polyclinic
(902) 629-8857
Charlottetown, PE
 
Saunders George H Dr
(902) 628-6555
22 St Peters Rd
Charlottetown, PE
 

Healthy Diets for Pregnancies

Provided By:

Obese Women in Pregnancy

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese moms-to-be should limit their weight gain during pregnancy to between 11 and 20 pounds to safeguard their health and that of their baby, according to newly updated expert guidelines.

That level of gestational weight gain is about half whats recommended for normal-weight pregnant women and reflects the concern over the rising number of obese expectant mothers in the United States.

The new guidelines -- the first since 1990 -- were issued jointly May 28 by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council.

"We looked at a balance of maternal outcomes related to weight gain in pregnancy and issues related to the outcome for the fetus and neonate," explained Dr. Patrick M. Catalano, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Case Western Reserve University and a member of the committee that wrote the new guidelines.

"There is good evidence that the amount of gestational weight gain for an obese woman can be related to the risk of needing a cesarean delivery and retention of weight gain after pregnancy, which puts the woman at further risk in future pregnancies," Catalano said.

Doctors typically define overweight as a body mass index (BMI) of between 25 and 30 and obesity as a BMI of 30 and above. BMI is based on weight and height; for example, a 5-foot-6-inch tall woman weighing between 115 and 154 pounds would have a BMI in the normal range.

But children born to overweight or obese moms face a rise in risk for preterm birth or being larger than normal at delivery, with extra fat, Catalano noted. Babies born large can suffer stuck shoulders and broken collar bones, experts say, and are prone to overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. And an overly large newborn poses risks for the mother at delivery, including vaginal tearing, bleeding and often the need for a cesarean section.

Infants born overweight also face higher odds for health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. Children born prematurely can suffer from impaired mental and physical development.

On the other end of the spectrum, the report's authors noted, women who are underweight during their pregnancy raise their babies' odds for stunted fetal growth and preterm delivery.

So, according to the new guidelines, maintaining a normal body weight and gaining only the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy is the best way to lower risks to both mother and child.

Specifically, the guidelines urge that:

  • Normal-weight women -- those with a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 -- should gain 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy.
  • Underweight women --those with a BMI less than 18.5 -- should gain 28 to 40 pounds during pregnancy.
  • Overweight women should gain 15 to 25 pounds.
  • Obese women should gain only 11 to 20 pounds.

The last recommendation marks a change from the 1990 guidelines, which recommended that obese mothers-to-be gain at least 15 pounds during pregnancy.

The report's authors were also concerned with the mother's weight at conception. Almost two-thirds of American women of childbearing age are overweight and almost one-third are obese, the report notes. The committee recommended, therefore, that women try to reach a normal BMI before conception and then gain the appropriate amount of weight during their pregnancy.

The committee also recommends that doctors provide diet and exercise counseling to women before conception so that women can achieve a normal BMI before becoming pregnant. In addition, prenatal care should focus on keeping weight gain within recommended guidelines.

Putting on excess pounds during pregnancy is becoming common: According to a study published in November in Obstetrics & Gynecology, nearly one in five pregnant American women now surpass recommended levels of weight gain during their pregnancies.

So, following the new guidelines "can be beneficial to both you and the baby," Catalano said. "The closer to a normal weight that you can be before you get pregnant is to your advantage and also to your baby's advantage because we know that your pre-pregnancy weight is a very important variable for these outcomes as well as the weight gain in pregnancy."

Dr. Michael Katz, senior vice president for research and global programs at the March of Dimes, a sponsor of the report, was dubious about the impact of the new guidelines long term.

"Pregnant women are very concerned about the outcome so they respond to recommendations, but they don't last very long," Katz said. "Obesity and overweight is a chronic situation. If a woman is overweight, she should adjust her weight first, then become pregnant. And one hopes, they would keep their weight in check subsequently, but that's unlikely."

Losing weight and keeping it off is a lifetime commitment, Katz noted. Being underweight is also a problem, "but obesity is by far the most prevalent and most serious problem," he said.

More information

The March of Dimes has more on weight gain during pregnancy.

SOURCES: Patrick M. Catalano, M.D., chairman, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland; Michael Katz, M.D., senior vice president for research and global programs, March of Dimes, White Plains, N.Y.; May 28, 2009, Institute of Medicine and National Research Council report, Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines

Author: By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

Useful Tips for Diet Healthy Pregnancy

Author: petersonbran

To maintain a proper gestational diabetes diet, the diet should keep the mother's blood sugar as normal as possible and at the same time, it has to provide all the required nutrition to both the mother and growing fetus. This includes larger amounts of minerals and vitamins which can be taken in the form of more low fat diary products, whole grain cereals and breads, fruits and vegetables. If the doctor prescribed additional prenatal vitamins, they should be taken in conjunction with the proper gestational diet. These prenatal vitamins can be taken at night before bed or early in the morning so that the iron can be easily absorbed on empty stomach.

You cannot afford to go starving right then when your body is craving for some energy. Energy is the vital ingredient for an active and healthy metabolism. We all know why metabolism is important, especially in your weight loss plan. To lose weight successfully you need to increase your metabolic rate. In order to achieve this you need a proper diet, the one that include vegetables, fruit, meat and fat as well. This does not include any of the fast food or synthetically manufactured food. Vegetables and fruit are rich in fibers, vitamins, proteins, everything that your metabolism needs. The faster your metabolism works, the faster you are burning calories.

The ideal diet healthy pregnancy is balance whole foods which will provide you with all the critical nutrients that you need. After all you aren’t just feeding yourself you are growing a baby and that requires a lot of energy especially in the very early months when cell division is really intense. Legumes such as beans, nuts, peas, and lentils, as well as whole grains such as rice, rye, barley, buckwheat, oats, and wheat are all foods that are needed to grow healthy baby’s and keep mom healthy.

Around 3-5 servings of vegetables and fruits are important for a healthy diet. Deep yellow and dark green leafy veggies are a boon for you and your baby. Keep sweet fruits handy with you, to combat cravings for sweet things. Make sure that you eat in variety to get all the required vitamins and minerals.

The other thing that you need to keep in mind is that your diet will directly effect your baby. When you are breastfeeding, you have an unbreakable bond with your baby. Whatever you eat, affects your baby's health. Therefore, when you are depriving yourself on some serious vitamins you are actually doing the same thing to your baby. Moreover, maybe your organism is strong and old enough to fight on its own, but your baby's health is extremely fragile and still depended on you to protect it.


About the Author:

Read about Herbal Remedy for Coronary Heart Disease andNatural Remedies for Blood Pressure and also know more aboutGuggul

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/alternative-medicine-articles/useful-tips-for-diet-healthy-pregnancy-929416.html