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Helping Kids Overcome Fears Regina SK

As parents we have the duty to make a point that our kids grow up with the items that they need and understand how to read, think for themselves, and of course conduct themselves. If everything went the way we want our favourite little children would not feel pain or sadness or even fear.

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1440 14th Ave
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Caughlin M Dr & Associates
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Pasqua Hospital
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Dewdney East Medical Clinic
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Kinship Centre
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Maximily Medical Clinic
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Cathedral Medical Professional Corporation
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Stapleford Medical Clinic
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Helping Kids Overcome Fears

Provided By:

Positive Growth for Kids

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- If you want your children to flourish, get them involved in extracurricular activities other than sports, new research suggests.

Children in fifth, sixth and seventh grades who took part in both sports and after-school activities such as Boys & Girls Clubs, 4-H or Scouts had the highest scores for "positive development" and the lowest scores for risky and problem behavior, according to a study from Tufts University, published recently in Developmental Psychology.

"Positive development" includes measures of competence, confidence, character, connection and caring, the study authors explained.

About 60 percent of U.S. children participate in at least one sport, making sports the most common after-school activity, according to information in a news release from Tufts.

Although a large body of research suggests that sports participation is associated with psychological well-being, positive social development and higher academic and professional achievement, some research has shown that participation in sports may be linked to some risky behaviors.

The new study, which looked at data on 1,357 adolescents who took part in the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, found that those students who only took part in sports had lower scores on characteristics of "positive development" and higher scores on bullying, substance use and depression than students who also took part in youth development activities.

"Parents should be certain that their teens balance participation in sports and in youth development programs," said Richard Lerner, professor of child development at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences in Boston. "Participation in even one youth development program may counteract possibly detrimental influences of sport participation on teen emotional and behavioral health, while also enhancing the health and well-being of their sons and daughters."

Youth development programs are after-school activities that involve adult mentorship, life skills training and opportunities for leadership, according to the study.

More information

The National Youth Development Information Center has more on youth development programs.

SOURCE: Tufts University, news release, Aug. 12, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

Tips on Helping Kids with Fears

Tips On How To Help Your Kids With Their Fears

Author: nlwest21

As parents we have the duty to make a point that our kids grow up with the items that they need and understand how to read, think for themselves, and of course conduct themselves. If everything went the way we want our favourite little children would not feel pain or sadness or even fear.

Unfortunately life is not always gratifying and our children might go through these emotions at particular points in their lives. While we might have the ability to screen them from much of the pain and sorrow in the world the one thing that is tough to control is their fear. Kids might be fearful of most anything starting at a young age.

I have known some kids that were frightened of water, the dark, or also grass. It is true that certain fears work to our vantage because it saves them from venturing into dangerous places. Kids who are afraid of water won’t dare go near a swimming pool the moment you turn your back. However, fears will only keep them from sincerely going on with their life and it is our job to aid them cope with that fear.

There are things that you can do to help them handle with these fears - but you will need to take it slow and keep in mind that patience is needed in order to succeed. Promote them to experience whatever it is that frightens them and show them that everything is ok. If they are scared of the water then try holding them close to you and taking them into the water with you.

If they are able to sense your arms round them and understand that you are not going to abruptly let them go then they will be a lot safer. Show them how great the water can be and what you can do while you are in it. Maybe use a pool toy and have them play with it. Ensure that you do not become defeated with them. Instead you should be encouraging them.


Try to get in the water with them everyday or at least three times a week to assist get them past their fear. It might take days or even weeks - but soon they will grow to enjoy it and have a better feel of it.


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Help your children to deal with their Childhood Fears. Early Motherhood has tips on this and so much more.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/parenting-articles/tips-on-how-to-help-your-kids-with-their-fears-926553.html