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Ontario Peach Sangria Regina SK

Take this traditional Spanish drink to a whole new level by infusing your favourite local white wine with fresh Ontario peaches and basil - a refresh ...

Scotiabank
(306) 780-1230
1504 Albert Street
Regina, SK
 
Scotiabank
(306) 780-1275
4110 Albert Street
Regina, SK
 
Scotiabank
(306) 780-1200
1980 11Th Avenue
Regina, SK
 
BMO Bank of Montreal
(306) 569-5733
305 Albert St N
Regina, SK
Type
Branch with ABM

BMO Bank of Montreal
(306) 569-5725
1871 Victoria Ave. E
Regina, SK
Type
Branch with ABM

Scotiabank
(306) 780-1250
2907 13Th Avenue
Regina, SK
 
BMO Bank of Montreal
(306) 569-5640
1800 Scarth St
Regina, SK
Type
Branch with ABM

Scotiabank
(306) 780-1285
625 University Park Drive
Regina, SK
 
BMO Bank of Montreal
(306) 569-5720
2705 Gordon Rd
Regina, SK
Type
Branch with ABM

Scotiabank
(306) 780-1220
3835 Sherwood Drive
Regina, SK
 

Ontario Peach Sangria

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(NC)-Take this traditional Spanish drink to a whole new level by infusing your favourite local white wine with fresh Ontario peaches and basil - a refreshing drink best served as a late afternoon aperitif on a warm summer's day. Don't forget to add swizzle sticks so your guests can spear the fresh peaches and enjoy them in this delightful beverage.

4 ripe Ontario peaches 4

3 cups one bottle of Ontario white wine 750 mL

4 basil leaves 4

The previous night or same morning: Slice peaches into segments, place in a pitcher and add white wine. Chill for several hours in fridge or cooler so flavours combine. Before serving, place a fresh basil leaf in each glass. Evenly distribute peach slices and wine.

Non-alcoholic version:

Replace white wine with an equivalent amount of lemonade or iced tea.

Serves 4.

Source: www.ontariotenderfruit.com: Developed by Hélène Laurendeau.

Fact: Did you know that peaches and nectarines have shoulders and cheeks? It's true; the shoulder is the bulge around the stem at the top of the fruit - the more mature the fruit, the fuller it becomes.And the cheeks of the fruit are on either side of the suture (the crease that runs from the stem to the blossom end).

Credit: www.newscanada.com