Safety Concerns When Dealing With Scaffolds Edmonton AB

Scaffolds are simply elevated temporary work platforms constructed to hold materials, workers or in some case both. Scaffold types can be said to include tubular frame, bracket, and outrigger, lean to, ladder jacks as well as mobile or single pole scaffold types.

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Safety Concerns When Dealing With Scaffolds

It can be said that every year in and out workers in the construction trades suffer serious and sometimes even fatal injuries due to improper construction and the use of scaffolds.

Scaffolds are simply elevated temporary work platforms constructed to hold materials, workers or in some case both. Scaffold types can be said to include tubular frame, bracket, and outrigger, lean to, ladder jacks as well as mobile or single pole scaffold types. Each of these types of scaffolds are suited to a particular type of work activity, has a rated capacity for the amount of load that it can safely carry. All in all it can be said that the best polices are to follow the manufacture’s specifications in terms of the erection of these scaffold products, their use, maintenance and finally dismantling.

There are a number of standard safety points to consider when it comes to scaffolds and their safety.

First of all scaffolds should be erected by a trained crew under the supervision of competent supervisory staff. The supervisory, or in some cases a most competent worker, should possess the knowledge experience and training to perform this vital task. Safety first. In addition a competent worker should also inspect the scaffold and its components before each shift uses the scaffold.

Scaffolds must be installed plumb (level) and stabilized to prevent movements. Scaffolds more than three sections high should be secured against movement by tie backs or guy wires. Next the sills on which the base plates of the scaffolds must be able to support the load it will be placed under. To accomplish this, the mud or soft ground may have to be replaced with gravel: loose back fill may have to be compacted and the area stabilized to prevent movement. To be effective mudsills must have full contact with their supporting surface. Therefore, things like holes, high spots (unleveled ground) etc. must be corrected before the sills are put in place.

The next concern is that there must be procedures and mechanics in place so that scaffolds have a means of “leveling” themselves. Screw jacks are often recommended and stated as the only really proper means of accomplishing this procedure. The use of blocks (built up under the base plates) is just plain and downright dangerous and prone to serious mishaps. If the scaffold has open access and is placed greatly in height then it may be more than a serious concern to have these scaffolds designed and even installed under the supervision of competent, experienced professional engineers.

Lastly all parts of the scaffold must be properly connected and the appropriate components used. Believe it or not it is not all that uncommon for inspectors to report that find missing pins or objects on routine scaffold inspections and as well find odd parts such as screws or ordinary nails used as replacement parts on some scaffold setups. In a similar vein it is not a good or wise idea to mix and match components from different types of scaffolds or even from different scaffold manufacturers or suppliers.

All in all when dealing with scaffolds in the construction trades it always a case of safety first on the job. An ounce of prevention is worth more than a ton of cure.

Prevention and safety are key. Safety first on the job site.

Harold Stofman Ace is the Place for Job Employment Training http://www.ace-training.net Manitoba-Real-Estate Construction http://www.sellyourmanitobacottage.com Ace Employment Services http://www.aceemploymentservices.net


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